Honey, I Shrunk the Kids
Honey, I Shrunk the Kids
PG | 23 June 1989 (USA)
Honey, I Shrunk the Kids Trailers

The scientist father of a teenage girl and boy accidentally shrinks his and two other neighborhood teens to the size of insects. Now the teens must fight diminutive dangers as the father searches for them.

Reviews
SnoReptilePlenty

Memorable, crazy movie

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ShangLuda

Admirable film.

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Kien Navarro

Exactly the movie you think it is, but not the movie you want it to be.

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Zandra

The movie turns out to be a little better than the average. Starting from a romantic formula often seen in the cinema, it ends in the most predictable (and somewhat bland) way.

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zkonedog

Have you ever just wanted to watch a fun, humorous, adventurous film that literally the entire family can enjoy? Well, you've come to the right movie!For a basic plot summary, "Honey, I Shrunk The Kids" begins with eccentric inventor Way Selinsky (Rick Moranis) crafting a machine to shrink objects to minuscule proportions. After an unfortunate baseball-through-the-window accident, the two Selinsky children (and two neighbor pals) are shrunk down and thrown out with the trash. The rest of the film focuses on their quest back home through a grass jungle, swarms of bees, giant ants, and the dreaded lawnmower.There are few movies that can be enjoyed by both old and young simultaneously. Usually, the jokes either use childish situations as a conduit to adult humor, or pander to the kiddies with enough syrupy sap to make adults nearly wretch. Fortunately, this film succeeds in both areas. The characters and drama are children fare, but the crazy adventures and touch of heart are enough to keep seasoned viewers tuned in for the duration.Is this little adventure flick an all-time family classic? Not necessarily...I don't know if anything starring Moranis truly can be. What it is, however, is a fun, quirky, 93-minutes filled with laughs, thrills, and even a bit of emotion thrown in. Avoid the sub-par sequels, but at least give this one a look for its originality and spectacle.

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ironhorse_iv

This movie is a great family-friendly adventure film that deserves another big look. Directed by Joe Johnston, this live-action Disney film tells the story of four kids, Nick Szalinski (Robert Oliveri), Amy Szalinski (Amy O'Neill), Russ Thompson (Thomas Wilson Brown) & Ron Thompson (Jared Rushton) whom, are accidentally shrunk to the size of bugs by Nick's father, Walter Szalinski (Rick Moranis)'s inventions. Being mistaken for trash, they must journey from the trash can on the curb of the street, through the backyard of Nick's house to reach their parents, so that they can bring them back to normal. Without spoiling the movie, too much, I know, a lot of critics back in the day, has criticize, this movie for being too violence and intense, but as a kid of the 1990s, I found this film to be, very entertaining. After all, I found films with children fighting for survival, realistic, and ballsy. This movie doesn't sugar-coated the action at all. I'm still mourning the death of the Ant from this film. The backyard of your house is indeed a jungle full of danger. I love all the little action set pieces, ranging from animal attacks like vicious-looking scorpion, loud-buzzing honey bee to man-made items like nearly drown by a Water Sprinkler, or getting nearly slice in half by a lawnmower. While, this movie was originally written to appeal to more child demographic called 'Teeny Weenies' by screenwriters, Stuart Gordon, Ed Naha, Tom Schulman & Brian Yuzna, the film tone was change, to appeal to a more mature audience, after kids films like 1984's 'Gremlins' & 1988's 'Who Framed Roger Rabbit' became a big hit, due to its amazing visual effects. Due to this, Joe Johnston was brought in to replace the original director, due to his design and special effects background. In my opinion, this movie wouldn't had work, without him. The great set pieces and practical effects really made this movie, wonderful to see. Heavily influenced by 1957's 'The Incredible Shrinking Man'. The use of rear projection, forced perspective, split screen and model effects all help convey the children's dwindling size. It was all very remarkable at the time, even if some of the visuals look a bit dated now. Even the cartoon opening sequence was pretty cool. The title coming down on the cartoon characters with some simple 3D effects was impressive at the time. The music that went along with the film is outstanding. Inspired by the music work by composer, Raymond Scott, composer James Horner added some really needed speed to the original music, 'Powerhouse' to make a new genius and genuinely special brand of intensive. However, since Horner didn't pay royalties or providing attribution to the original song, Scott's estate threatened to sue Disney after the movie was released. After prolonged negotiation, they settled. While the on-screen credits were not changed, cue sheets for the movie do note the use of Scott's piece. Another fun fact about this film, is the fact that the animated short 1989's 'Tummy Trouble' was released theatrically with this movie. Many credit the success of this film towards audiences wanting to see more of Roger Rabbit. Although, for me, personally, I came to want to see this movie for Rick Moranis. I really hope, that he returns back to acting, one day. He's greatly missed. His acting in this film was amazing. He really capture that nerdy, misunderstood inventor father feel. Even the supporting actors that played the other parents, weren't that bad. Matt Frewler as Walter's redneck neighbor, Russ Thompson Sr. was lot of fun. Much of the humor of the film, comes with the relationship between Russ and Walter. I like watching two polar opposites trying to work together for a common ground. The child actors that played the children in the film, were alright for the most part, too. I kinda like, that each character had a part to play in the kids surviving their own ordeal. Still, there is one thing that particularly bugs me about the shrinking effects. The kids' sizes are portrayed inconsistently. They are sometimes bigger than ant, and other times, smaller than them. It's a bit jarring, to watch, as there seem to be no sense of scale. Another thing that got me puzzle is how the machine honestly works. Let's say, that it works by sucking empty space out of a given object, but leaving its mass unchanged, as the main character says. If you were to shrink, down, wouldn't you end up with weight that you have in normal size, similar to 2015's 'Ant Man'? So, how are they able to be sweep up, in the beginning of the film? Similarly, how are they able to breath or digest food? The air would be too thin. I know, the movie isn't supposed to be science accuracy, but it's somewhat noticeable, but I'm willing to look past that. This movie is indeed a bit nostalgia for me, so I might be a littles bias. However, I do see some of the film's faults, but it's nowhere near as bad as other critics make it out to be. The several follow-ups are much, much worst. 1992's 'Honey, I Blew up the Kid' was mediocre at best. 1994's 'Honey, I Shrunk the Audience' was a surprise hit 3D video ride when it opened at Walt Disney World's Epcot Park in 1994, running until 2010 there. However, it did get somewhat dated toward the late 1990s, with the kids actors outgrowing their kid couther parts. Last, but not least, 1997's live-action direct-to-video 'Honey, We Shrunk Ourselves' was very forgettable. Another thing, the whole running gag with Diane Szalinski (Marcia Strassman) fainting in each movie is a little harder to watch now, since the actress death in 2014. Despite that; overall: the first movie was pretty good, but it was a little short for great. Still, it's worth checking out if you got the time. So go see it!

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Paul Magne Haakonsen

I was initially settling on a rating of six stars out of ten, but upped it to seven because this movie is one of those movies that truly withstands the test of time. It was great family entertainment back in 1989, and it is still equally good today.The story in "Honey, I Shrunk the Kids" has something for everyone in the family. It is about an inventor who has invented a shrinking ray device. And when his son and daughter along with the two neighbor boys are accidentally shrunk, they are on an adventure of big proportions in an attempt to cross their own backyard and get back to the lab.Taken into consideration that the movie is from 1989, then the effects are still okay for today. Of course not able to match the incredible CGI that we have in movies today. But back then it was fabulous, and it is still sufficient by today for what it was supposed to do.The cast in the movie was good, as it usually is in Walt Disney movies. Rick Moranis is, as always, great on the screen, as were Matt Frewer. But actually the whole cast were doing good jobs with their roles and characters.As mentioned earlier, this is a wholesome family movie. And if you haven't already seen it, you should take the time to sit down and watch it, especially if you have a younger child in the family.

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SnoopyStyle

Wayne Szalinski (Rick Moranis) is a hopeless inventor working on a new shrink ray. It's getting into the way of his marriage to Diane (Marcia Strassman). She's taking a break. His next door neighbor Big Russ Thompson (Matt Frewer) is annoyed. While all the adults are away, Ron Thompson hits a baseball knocking off the shrink ray. Little Russ Thompson forces Ron next door to apologize. Russ actually likes Amy Szalinski. The shrink ray miniaturizes all four kids. Then Wayne returns and sweeps everybody up. He throws the kids out into the yards before he realizes too late.The silly title hides a fun little family movie. It is a cheerful, joyful adventure. It's sincere. It's old fashion Disney and that's the charm of it. The special effects is charming and never gets too scary. It has a few thrills. There's even a giant cookie. The kids are not the greatest actors but that also has a charm of its own. Rick Moranis hones in his dorkiness. This is simple family fun.

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